New Zealand

New Zealand

by Paul Chapman — Posted on February 13, 2017

New Zealand is an island nation in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—that of the North Island, or Te Ika-a-Māui, and the South Island, or Te Waipounamu—and numerous smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 1,500 kilometres (900 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal and plant life. The country’s varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand’s capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

14 Comments

  1. New Zealand is the adventure capital of the world. Hiking, skydiving, caving, bungy jumping, skiing — everything here is geared towards getting you outside and doing something incredible. As a popular destination for backpackers and budget travelers, New Zealand is really affordable and offers many ways to save money. I loved my time in New Zealand — the people were friendly, the country was beautiful (I can see why the shot Lord of the Rings there), and you meet a lot of great travelers there. It’s one of the best countries in the world and a place not to be missed. I’ve never heard anyone not love their time in the country. Most people don’t want to leave! I didn’t. You really can’t go wrong with this majestic country. It’s one of my top ten countries in the world! Use this guide to plan the adventure of the lifetime on a budget!

  2. Whether there will be Backpackers, Hostels, Lodges, Motels, Hotels, Apartments, Bed and Breakfast’s, Guest Houses, Farm Stays, YHA’s, Apartments, we have available cheap rates for your accommodation throughout New Zealand.

    New Zealand has network of numerous Backpacker Hostels ranging from traditional to up market Hostels that have their own bars and restaurants.

    If you are travelling as a group whether it be family or friends there is a range of budget motel, hotel, apartment and lodge accommodation, offering amazingly cheap accommodation deals. Affordably priced hotels and apartments are available in the larger cities of Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and major tourist locations throughout New Zealand.

    There is a range of Bed and Breakfast accommodation ranging from Boutique Inns and Lodges, to small affordable guesthouses, to homestay accommodation to give the traveller opportunity to experience ‘Kiwi’ hospitality or farmstay accommodation where you are staying on a fully operational farm.

    If you are travelling anytime in the next 4 weeks – there are some cheap deals being offered with our “Budget Beds” accommodation network. Some accommodation providers – especially in quieter periods will really drop their rates in preference to having an empty room.

    Even in busy periods when the town is full and you supposedly will not find a bed anywhere – it is well worth while checking our “Budget Beds” accommodation. We often see not only available rooms, but cheaper rates. Last Minute Reservations are changing continually so you can check regularly.

  3. Top 10 Cheap Backpacking Tips
    Pack Light. With backpacking, your mantra should always be pack light. …
    Camp Out. …
    Get a Hostel with a Kitchen. …
    Bring Your Own Snacks. …
    Buy a Train Pass. …
    Walk, Don’t Take a Cab. …
    Be Careful of Pickpockets and Scam Artists. …
    Visit the Liquor Store.

  4. 1. Travel at the right time. New Zealand’s seasons are the reverse of those in the Northern Hemisphere, so the busy summer travel season runs from December through February. Both international travelers and Kiwis swarm the country’s most popular sights this time of year, and prices rise accordingly for everything from airfare to accommodations. Consider visiting during the quieter spring or fall shoulder seasons, or during the winter (where tourism is down everywhere except ski areas like Queenstown).

    2. Focus your trip. New Zealand may not look like a big country, but if you want to take in the major sights on both islands, a week or two just won’t cut it. If your time or budget is limited, concentrate on either the North Island or the South Island, not both. Staying focused will save you a mound of money on internal transportation; domestic flights or gas for long car trips can eat away at your vacation budget.

    3. Look for airfare sales. Because of New Zealand’s remote location, airfare is a pricey proposition for most international visitors. To help trim costs, keep an eagle eye out for fare sales on major carriers like Air New Zealand and Qantas. Both airlines offer sales and discounts by email; you can also sign up for fare alerts from your favorite booking site or airfare aggregator (such as Expedia.com, TripAdvisor.com/CheapFlightsHome, Momondo.com or Kayak.com).

    Tips for Finding Cheap Airfare

    4. Get creative with fare combinations. For American travelers, most sales on Air New Zealand and Qantas are for departures from Los Angeles or San Francisco. If you don’t live near one of these airports, consider booking a cheap fare aboard a discount airline like Southwest, JetBlue or Virgin America to get you to and from California. The cost of that flight plus an LAX-Auckland sale ticket on Air New Zealand could be cheaper than booking the whole itinerary through a single airline.

    5. Keep an eye on exchange rates. Along with fuel prices, currency fluctuations can have a noticeable effect on the cost of your airfare. I took advantage of this myself on a recent trip; I made my booking at a time when the U.S. dollar was strengthening against the Kiwi dollar, which resulted in lower fares from Air New Zealand.

  5. Here’s a rundown of what should go in your suitcase:
    Clothing
    Shirts/blouses. Bring up to five short-sleeved or long-sleeved shirts or blouses (how many of each depends on the season) in a cotton/polyester blend. Shirts with long sleeves that roll up easily can double as short-sleeved. Look for a wrinkle-camouflaging pattern or blended fabrics that show a minimum of wrinkles. Synthetic-blend fabrics (such as Coolmax or microfiber) often dry overnight.
    Pants/shorts. Bring two pairs: one lightweight cotton and another super-lightweight pair for hot and muggy big cities. Jeans can be too hot for summer travel (and are slow to dry). Many travelers like lightweight convertible pants/shorts with zip-off legs. While not especially stylish, they’re functional in Italy, where you can use them to cover up inside churches while still beating the heat outside. Button-down wallet pockets are safest (though still not nearly as thief-proof as a money belt). If you bring shorts, one pair is probably enough. Shorts can double as a swimsuit for men when swimming in lakes or the sea.
    Underwear and socks. Bring five sets (lighter dries quicker). Bamboo or cotton/nylon-blend socks dry faster than 100 percent cotton, which lose their softness when air-dried.
    Shoes. Bring one pair of comfortable walking shoes with good traction. Mephisto, Ecco, and Rieker look dressier and more European than sneakers, but are still comfortable. Sturdy, low-profile tennis shoes with a good tread are fine, too. For a second pair, consider sandals in summer. Flip-flops are handy if you’ll be using bathrooms down the hall. Whichever shoes you bring, make sure they are well broken in before you leave home.
    Sweater or lightweight fleece. Warm and dark is best — for layering and dressing up.
    Jacket. Bring a light and water-resistant windbreaker with a hood. Neutral colors used to look more European than bright ones, but now everything from azure blue to pumpkin orange has made its way into European wardrobes. A hooded jacket of Gore-Tex or other waterproof material is good if you expect rain. (For summer travel, I wing it without rain gear — but always pack for rain in Britain and Ireland.)
    Tie or scarf. For instant respectability, bring anything lightweight that can break the monotony and make you look snazzy.
    Swimsuit. To use public pools, you’ll need a swimsuit (men can’t just wear shorts; and in France, men need to wear Speedo-type swimsuits — not swim trunks).
    Sleepwear/loungewear. Comfy streetwear — such as shorts, leggings, T-shirts, tank tops, yoga pants, and other lightweight athletic gear — can be used as pajamas, post-dinner loungewear, and a modest cover-up to get you to the bathroom down the hall.
    Documents, Money, and Travel Info
    Money belt (or neck wallet). This flat, hidden, zippered pouch — worn around your waist (or like a necklace) and tucked under your clothes — is essential for the peace of mind it brings. You could lose everything except your money belt, and the trip could still go on. Get a lightweight one with a low-profile color (I like beige). For more, see my article on money belts.
    Money. Bring your preferred mix of a debit card, a credit card, and an emergency stash of hard US cash (in $20 bills).
    Documents. Bring your passport; plane, train, and rental car documents or vouchers; driver’s license; and any other useful cards (student ID, hostel membership card, and so on). Photocopies and a couple of passport-type photos can help you get replacements more quickly if the originals are lost or stolen. In your luggage, pack a record of all reservations (print out your hotel confirmation emails). Bring any necessary contact info if you have health or travel insurance.
    Guidebooks and maps. Pack the travel info you’ll need on the ground (or download it into your ereader). I like to rip out appropriate chapters from guidebooks and staple them together, or use special slide-on laminated book covers.
    Small notepad and pen. A tiny notepad in your back pocket or day pack is a great organizer, reminder, and communication aid.
    Journal. An empty book to be filled with the experiences of your trip will be your most treasured souvenir. Attach a photocopied calendar page of your itinerary. Use a hardbound type designed to last a lifetime, rather than a floppy spiral notebook. My custom-designed Rick Steves Travel Journals are rugged, simple blank books that come in two sizes. Another great brand, with a cult following among travel writers, is Moleskine.
    Small day pack. A lightweight pack is great for carrying your sweater, camera, guidebook, and picnic goodies while you leave your large bag at the hotel or train station. Don’t use a fanny pack — they’re magnets for pickpockets.

  6. Backpackersvoice what great name wish I thought off that, also what a great looking site looks amazing. Also what great idea people can get involved and up load a travel
    Story amazing just wish I thought off it!!!!

  7. The first thing I need to tell you about so called solo travel is that you’re hardly ever alone!

    That’s the great thing about backpacking – it’s a social thing to do.

    No matter where in the world I’ve been it’s never been an issue to meet new people – hell I even met a guy on my first flight to Australia and ended up travelling with him for 2 months!

    I took a 3 week trip to Thailand before I started my current adventure and literally spent no more than 45mins without someone to talk too during the who thing.

    Unless you really can’t talk to strangers or you put yourself across as cold, boring or super weird making new friends on the road is no worries at all, and more often than not you’ll join these new faces to explore with – whether that’s on a day trip or making your way around an entire country or continent you’ll never be short of friendly faces.

    And the people you spend time travelling with will more often than not become some of your greatest and closest friends – travelling is a very intense and unique thing to share.

  8. hether there will be Backpackers, Hostels, Lodges, Motels, Hotels, Apartments, Bed and Breakfast’s, Guest Houses, Farm Stays, YHA’s, Apartments, we have available cheap rates for your accommodation throughout New Zealand.
    New Zealand has network of numerous Backpacker Hostels ranging from traditional to up market Hostels that have their own bars and restaurants.
    If you are travelling as a group whether it be family or friends there is a range of budget motel, hotel, apartment and lodge accommodation, offering amazingly cheap accommodation deals. Affordably priced hotels and apartments are available in the larger cities of Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and major tourist locations throughout New Zealand.
    There is a range of Bed and Breakfast accommodation ranging from Boutique Inns and Lodges, to small affordable guesthouses, to homestay accommodation to give the traveller opportunity to experience ‘Kiwi’ hospitality or farmstay accommodation where you are staying on a fully operational farm.
    If you are travelling anytime in the next 4 weeks – there are some cheap deals being offered with our “Budget Beds” accommodation network. Some accommodation providers – especially in quieter periods will really drop their rates in preference to having an empty room.
    Even in busy periods when the town is full and you supposedly will not find a bed anywhere – it is well worth while checking our “Budget Beds” accommodation. We often see not only available rooms, but cheaper rates. Last Minute Reservations are changing continually so you can check regularly.
    Reply

  9. New Zealand is the adventure capital of the world. Hiking, skydiving, caving, bungy jumping, skiing — everything here is geared towards getting you outside and doing something incredible. As a popular destination for backpackers and budget travelers, New Zealand is really affordable and offers many ways to save money. I loved my time in New Zealand — the people were friendly, the country was beautiful (I can see why the shot Lord of the Rings there), and you meet a lot of great travelers there. It’s one of the best countries in the world and a place not to be missed. I’ve never heard anyone not love their time in the country. Most people don’t want to leave! I didn’t. You really can’t go wrong with this majestic country. It’s one of my top ten countries in the world! Use this guide to plan the adventure of the lifetime on a budget!

  10. New Zealand is the adventure capital of the world. Hiking, skydiving, caving, bungy jumping, skiing — everything here is geared towards getting you outside and doing something incredible. As a popular destination for backpackers and budget travelers, New Zealand is really affordable and offers many ways to save money. I loved my time in New Zealand — the people were friendly, the country was beautiful (I can see why the shot Lord of the Rings there), and you meet a lot of great travelers there. It’s one of the best countries in the world and a place not to be missed. I’ve never heard anyone not love their time in the country. Most people don’t want to leave! I didn’t. You really can’t go wrong with this majestic country. It’s one of my top ten countries in the world! Use this guide to plan the adventure of the lifetime on a budget!


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