Australia

February 13, 2017

Australia  officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania and numerous smaller islands. It is the world’s sixth-largest country by total area.

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  1. Australia’s East Coast is HUGE and has for many years, been one of the world’s most popular backpacker trails – sun, islands, cities, rainforest, reef, unique wildlife and a laidback lifestyle. The East Coast is home to some of the most unique places in the world including the largest sand island and the largest living organism on the planet! If you’re planning a trip along the East Coast, check out these 20 tips to prepare you for paradise.

    1. Prepare for long bus journeys

    The East Coast stretches for 3,600KM between Melbourne and Cairns – that’s a long drive! Most backpackers will travel overland on a hop on / hop off bus pass or with a tour company. If you are short on time, it is possible to catch an overnight bus from Melbourne to Sydney, Sydney to Byron Bay and the ever popular Rainbow Beach – gateway to Fraser Island and to Airlie Beach – gateway to the Whitsundays. Read our Guide to Fraser Island & the Whitsunday Islands here…

    Either way – prepare for a long trip! Australia’s buses are comfortable however, with air conditioning, free wifi, a toilet, sometimes a movie and many stops en route. TIP: buy a neck pillow, plug in your headphones, have a nap, relax, read a book and take in the stunning sights along the way.

  2. 1. START OFF BY STAYING IN A HOSTEL

    Hostels are the cheapest accommodation, and you will meet like-minded backpackers who can give you tips and recommendations. Often times you will even end up travelling with a few of them when you decide to move on.

    Tips for choosing a hostel: compares reviews and prices and make sure it’s in an area that’s centrally located and has public transportation nearby, or is walking distance to key places. ALSO, look for deals. Typically hostels offer incentives such as ‘Stay 6 nights and get your 7th free,’ meal deals, and include free breakfast.

    ***Lots of hostels offer ‘Work for Accommodation.’ This pretty much means that if you work at the hostel the agreed upon amount of hours, you can live there for free. Ana and I did this in Cairns for our first couple months, it was a great way to figure out our next stop.

    2. WATCH YOUR SPENDING ON ALCOHOL

    This is probably the most important way to save money while traveling here. Unlike many top backpacking destinations, alcohol in Australia is very expensive. VERY. If cutting out alcohol isn’t your thing, I would recommend drinking in your hostel, sharing travel stories, and splitting the costs with other fellow backpackers. Or look for bars that have ‘Backpacker Deals’ as well, usually offering drink specials.

    3. GROCERIES INSTEAD OF RESTAURANTS

    This was the next biggest shock upon arrival, how expensive the food was. Chances are your accommodation will have a fridge/cupboard space that you can utilize, do it. Buying your groceries for the week instead of eating out/getting takeaway saves tons of $$$ and allows you to eat healthier.

    4. MAKE BACKPACKER FRIENDS

    If your travels are flexible, a great way to explore is by making friends and splitting costs. Road trips, activities, and food costs are much more reasonable with a group. Plus, half the fun of travelling is meeting people and hearing their story! Chances are you will meet some lifelong friends along the way.

    5. FIND A JOB

    Hospitality jobs and farm work are the easiest jobs to get if you are on a Working Holiday Visa, and employers understand that you are looking for short-term employment. Also, working in a remote area typically has a higher wage, free accommodation, and allows for ‘off the beaten path’ travels. I did this and it was the best decision of my life.

    6. LOOK FOR FREE ACTIVITIES

    Australia has endless amounts outdoor activities to offer that involve spending no money, indulge in this! Experience the beauty nature has to offer here through hiking, beach-hopping, waterfall chasing; there’s just so much. You don’t need to spend money to have fun!

  3. Top 10 Cheap Backpacking Tips
    Pack Light. With backpacking, your mantra should always be pack light. …
    Camp Out. …
    Get a Hostel with a Kitchen. …
    Bring Your Own Snacks. …
    Buy a Train Pass. …
    Walk, Don’t Take a Cab. …
    Be Careful of Pickpockets and Scam Artists. …
    Visit the Liquor Store.

  4. Contos Beach Margaret River
    24 Feb How Much Do I Need To Budget For Backpacking In Australia?
    Posted at 02:49h in Blog by Victoria 2 Comments Share
    Contos Beach Margaret River

    Australia is one of the most popular backpacking destinations in the world. The superb beaches, sunny weather and stunning national parks are all definitely things to write home about.

    In order to make sure you see and do all the things you want to Down Under, it’s wise to have a good idea of how much things cost, so you can plan accordingly.

    If you are heading to Australia, here is a guide to how much things cost and how much you should aim to put away before you jump on the plane.

    Accommodation
    From hostels and motels to couch surfing and camping – there’s plenty of accommodation options available.

    Hostels are one of the best options for backpackers, but costs vary from city to city.

    It’s realistic to try and budget around $35-$50 per night for budget hostel accommodation. Bear in mind that if you are planning to travel over peak seasons, such as Christmas, or if you want to stay in a prime location like Bondi Beach, then you may need to allocate a little more. Basic motels can cost anywhere upwards of $70 a night.

    Daily Budget: $35+ a day

    Food And Drink
    Depending on how strong the Aussie dollar is against your currency, food and drink can seem expensive in Australia. But with a little effort it can be easy to find good grub at a backpacker-friendly price in most cities.

    A single traveller under the age of 35 spends $104 a week on food and drink. Supermarket shopping can be a little more expensive than you will find back home, with a loaf of bread costing 53% more in Sydney than London and 1 litre of milk costing an extra 22%.

    If you want to grab food on the move then food courts, found in all major Australian cities, can be a great place to lunch for around $10 – $15, and a cup of coffee will set you back $3 – $4. A schooner of beer (just less than a pint) is normally priced at around $7 – $8, and a good cocktail will set you back $15 – $20.

    However, shop around you will find decent happy-hour deals – where a schooner of beer or a glass of wine will set you back as little as $5.

    Daily Budget: $15+ (scale this cost up if you are planning on eating out or going out for drinks regularly)

    Travel
    Hitting the open road in a second-hand campervan is pretty much a right of passage when you’re backpacking around Aus. Used campervans for sale at a decent price are pretty easy to come by in most major towns and cities, and you can easily find them for sale on Gumtree. Or if you want something shorter term, there are lots of campervan rental options that start from as little as $35 a day (don’t forget to add in the cost of fuel).

    If you don’t fancy doing the driving yourself, then you can hop on/off a Greyhound Coach. Passes start from $329 and allow you to travel from destinations such as Brisbane to Cairns for $329.

    Air travel is also popular between the main cities in Australia, as it is quick and relatively hassle free. Tiger Air and Jetstar are popular and cheap carriers. Flights between Sydney to Melbourne typically start at around $80 one way.

    Daily Budget: This is dependent on when and where you want to travel in Australia

    Trips/Tours
    There are countless trips and tours available in Australia. Below is a list of prices for visiting some of Australia’s most popular attractions:

    Full day tour of the Barrier Reef – anywhere upwards of $99
    Sydney Harbour Bridge Climb – between $148 – $158
    A three-day trip to Uluru (Ayres Rock) – starts from $350
    Australia Zoo – $59
    Wet ‘n’ Wild Water Park Gold Coast – $69
    Surfing lesson in Byron Bay – From $60

  5. Here’s a rundown of what should go in your suitcase:
    Clothing
    Shirts/blouses. Bring up to five short-sleeved or long-sleeved shirts or blouses (how many of each depends on the season) in a cotton/polyester blend. Shirts with long sleeves that roll up easily can double as short-sleeved. Look for a wrinkle-camouflaging pattern or blended fabrics that show a minimum of wrinkles. Synthetic-blend fabrics (such as Coolmax or microfiber) often dry overnight.
    Pants/shorts. Bring two pairs: one lightweight cotton and another super-lightweight pair for hot and muggy big cities. Jeans can be too hot for summer travel (and are slow to dry). Many travelers like lightweight convertible pants/shorts with zip-off legs. While not especially stylish, they’re functional in Italy, where you can use them to cover up inside churches while still beating the heat outside. Button-down wallet pockets are safest (though still not nearly as thief-proof as a money belt). If you bring shorts, one pair is probably enough. Shorts can double as a swimsuit for men when swimming in lakes or the sea.
    Underwear and socks. Bring five sets (lighter dries quicker). Bamboo or cotton/nylon-blend socks dry faster than 100 percent cotton, which lose their softness when air-dried.
    Shoes. Bring one pair of comfortable walking shoes with good traction. Mephisto, Ecco, and Rieker look dressier and more European than sneakers, but are still comfortable. Sturdy, low-profile tennis shoes with a good tread are fine, too. For a second pair, consider sandals in summer. Flip-flops are handy if you’ll be using bathrooms down the hall. Whichever shoes you bring, make sure they are well broken in before you leave home.
    Sweater or lightweight fleece. Warm and dark is best — for layering and dressing up.
    Jacket. Bring a light and water-resistant windbreaker with a hood. Neutral colors used to look more European than bright ones, but now everything from azure blue to pumpkin orange has made its way into European wardrobes. A hooded jacket of Gore-Tex or other waterproof material is good if you expect rain. (For summer travel, I wing it without rain gear — but always pack for rain in Britain and Ireland.)
    Tie or scarf. For instant respectability, bring anything lightweight that can break the monotony and make you look snazzy.
    Swimsuit. To use public pools, you’ll need a swimsuit (men can’t just wear shorts; and in France, men need to wear Speedo-type swimsuits — not swim trunks).
    Sleepwear/loungewear. Comfy streetwear — such as shorts, leggings, T-shirts, tank tops, yoga pants, and other lightweight athletic gear — can be used as pajamas, post-dinner loungewear, and a modest cover-up to get you to the bathroom down the hall.
    Documents, Money, and Travel Info
    Money belt (or neck wallet). This flat, hidden, zippered pouch — worn around your waist (or like a necklace) and tucked under your clothes — is essential for the peace of mind it brings. You could lose everything except your money belt, and the trip could still go on. Get a lightweight one with a low-profile color (I like beige). For more, see my article on money belts.
    Money. Bring your preferred mix of a debit card, a credit card, and an emergency stash of hard US cash (in $20 bills).
    Documents. Bring your passport; plane, train, and rental car documents or vouchers; driver’s license; and any other useful cards (student ID, hostel membership card, and so on). Photocopies and a couple of passport-type photos can help you get replacements more quickly if the originals are lost or stolen. In your luggage, pack a record of all reservations (print out your hotel confirmation emails). Bring any necessary contact info if you have health or travel insurance.
    Guidebooks and maps. Pack the travel info you’ll need on the ground (or download it into your ereader). I like to rip out appropriate chapters from guidebooks and staple them together, or use special slide-on laminated book covers.
    Small notepad and pen. A tiny notepad in your back pocket or day pack is a great organizer, reminder, and communication aid.
    Journal. An empty book to be filled with the experiences of your trip will be your most treasured souvenir. Attach a photocopied calendar page of your itinerary. Use a hardbound type designed to last a lifetime, rather than a floppy spiral notebook. My custom-designed Rick Steves Travel Journals are rugged, simple blank books that come in two sizes. Another great brand, with a cult following among travel writers, is Moleskine.
    Small day pack. A lightweight pack is great for carrying your sweater, camera, guidebook, and picnic goodies while you leave your large bag at the hotel or train station. Don’t use a fanny pack — they’re magnets for pickpockets.

  6. VERY IMPORTANT, I just hope if your thinking off traveling you get to read this? First make sure you write down your pass port number on peace off paper and keep safe. If you lose your passport you will need the number or your be down a very sticky road. Next try leave sum money back home with your mum and dad, if you lose your cards and money they can still send you money from Western union iv done this my self in phippines. I always took a tent with me on my trips used it many times and it saved me a lot money from the $15 night hostels.

  7. KINGS CANYON. The Holiday Park at Kings Canyon Resort features 36 Budget Lodge Rooms (backpacker-style accommodation) with shared bathroom and kitchen facilities.

    They offer the perfect starting point for an Australian outback adventure while enjoying the convenience of all the amenities available to the resort guests.

    Come to enjoy a true Australian outback holiday experience near Ayers Rock (Uluru), with several exciting hikes, camel rides and so much more. For a full list of the activities at Kings Canyon click here.

    Budget Lodge Rooms
    Budget Lodge Room interior view

    Lodge Rooms feature blankets, refrigerator, linen, tea and coffee making facilities and a television.

    Budget Quad Room
    Our backpacker style quad rooms with three single beds and one double bed are located in the campground, with shared bathroom block and kitchen facilities. They offer the perfect starting point to explore the spectacular unspoilt wilderness of the area and the chance to get back to nature, while still enjoying the convenience of all the amenities available to the resort guests. Lodge rooms feature a reverse cycle air-conditioning unit, blankets, refrigerator, linen, tea and coffee making facilities, and a flat screen television.
    Budget Twin/Double Room
    Our backpacker style double or twin bedded rooms are located in the campground, with shared bathroom block and kitchen facilities. They offer the perfect starting point to explore the spectacular unspoilt wilderness of the area and the chance to get back to nature, while still enjoying the convenience of all the amenities available to the resort guests. Lodge rooms feature a reverse cycle air-conditioning unit, blankets, refrigerator, linen, tea and coffee making facilities, and a flat screen television.

  8. 1. START OFF BY STAYING IN A HOSTEL
    Hostels are the cheapest accommodation, and you will meet like-minded backpackers who can give you tips and recommendations. Often times you will even end up travelling with a few of them when you decide to move on.
    Tips for choosing a hostel: compares reviews and prices and make sure it’s in an area that’s centrally located and has public transportation nearby, or is walking distance to key places. ALSO, look for deals. Typically hostels offer incentives such as ‘Stay 6 nights and get your 7th free,’ meal deals, and include free breakfast.
    ***Lots of hostels offer ‘Work for Accommodation.’ This pretty much means that if you work at the hostel the agreed upon amount of hours, you can live there for free. Ana and I did this in Cairns for our first couple months, it was a great way to figure out our next stop.
    2. WATCH YOUR SPENDING ON ALCOHOL
    This is probably the most important way to save money while traveling here. Unlike many top backpacking destinations, alcohol in Australia is very expensive. VERY. If cutting out alcohol isn’t your thing, I would recommend drinking in your hostel, sharing travel stories, and splitting the costs with other fellow backpackers. Or look for bars that have ‘Backpacker Deals’ as well, usually offering drink specials.
    3. GROCERIES INSTEAD OF RESTAURANTS
    This was the next biggest shock upon arrival, how expensive the food was. Chances are your accommodation will have a fridge/cupboard space that you can utilize, do it. Buying your groceries for the week instead of eating out/getting takeaway saves tons of $$$ and allows you to eat healthier.
    4. MAKE BACKPACKER FRIENDS
    If your travels are flexible, a great way to explore is by making friends and splitting costs. Road trips, activities, and food costs are much more reasonable with a group. Plus, half the fun of travelling is meeting people and hearing their story! Chances are you will meet some lifelong friends along the way.
    5. FIND A JOB
    Hospitality jobs and farm work are the easiest jobs to get if you are on a Working Holiday Visa, and employers understand that you are looking for short-term employment. Also, working in a remote area typically has a higher wage, free accommodation, and allows for ‘off the beaten path’ travels. I did this and it was the best decision of my life.
    6. LOOK FOR FREE ACTIVITIES
    Australia has endless amounts outdoor activities to offer that involve spending no money, indulge in this! Experience the beauty nature has to offer here through hiking, beach-hopping, waterfall chasing; there’s just so much. You don’t need to spend money to have fun!

  9. Beyond the Ten Essentials
    Backpack.
    Daypack or summit pack.
    Pack cover.
    Tent, tarp or bivy sack (with stakes, guylines)
    Tent-pole repair sleeve.
    Footprint (if desired for tent)
    Sleeping bag.
    Stuff sack or compression sack.


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